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Hi @SoWhy,

Here's the primary page about Accessibility for LibreOffice:

  • https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/accessibility/

From that page:

Assistive Technology (AT) tools such as screen readers and magnifiers, as well as other tools, connect to LibreOffice using the Java Accessibility API (JAA) via the Java Access Bridge for Windows or GNOME.

The Java Accessibility API is supported by the most popular AT tools including:

(The latter two items are designed to work on GNU/Linux, not Windows)

Hi @SoWhy,

Here's the primary page about Accessibility for LibreOffice:

  • https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/accessibility/

From that page:

Assistive Technology (AT) tools such as screen readers and magnifiers, as well as other tools, connect to LibreOffice using the Java Accessibility API (JAA) via the Java Access Bridge for Windows or GNOME.

The Java Accessibility API is supported by the most popular AT tools including:

(The latter two items are designed to work on GNU/Linux, not Windows)

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fix my scatter-brained answer

Hi @SoWhy,

Here's the primary page about Accessibility Whoops! Sorry -- got stuck on screen readers instead of speech-to-text!

I know that there are some people interested in this problem on GNU/Linux:

  • http://listarchives.libreoffice.org/global/users/msg03978.html
  • https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/libreoffice/+question/212561

On Windows, it sounds like Dragon should have decent support:

As of this writing, Dragon does not yet provide Full Text Control (FTC) in LibreOffice’s Writer. Dragon resides in compatibility mode, which means that provided you do not use the mouse and keyboard within a document, you will have full editing and correcting capabilities by voice. You can even issue the following commands, for LibreOffice:

  • https://www.libreoffice.org/get-help/accessibility/

From that page:

Assistive Technology (AT) tools such as screen readers example: “bold (words)” or “capitalize (words)” – although the initial response to these voice commands may seem a little slow. The Dictation Box functions quite well in LibreOffice, of course.

LibreOffice’s menus and magnifiers, as well as other tools, connect icons cannot be clicked by voice, however, custom voice commands are easily written to LibreOffice using the Java Accessibility API (JAA) via the Java Access Bridge for Windows or GNOME.

The Java Accessibility API is supported by the most popular AT tools including:perform the many available features within LibreOffice.

(The latter two items are designed to work on GNU/Linux, not Windows)

Does anyone else have experience with Dragon?

Hi @SoWhy,

Whoops! Sorry -- got stuck on screen readers instead of speech-to-text!

I know that there are some people interested in this problem on GNU/Linux:

  • http://listarchives.libreoffice.org/global/users/msg03978.html
  • https://answers.launchpad.net/ubuntu/+source/libreoffice/+question/212561

On Windows, it sounds like Dragon should have decent support:

As of this writing, Dragon does not yet provide Full Text Control (FTC) in LibreOffice’s Writer. Dragon resides in compatibility mode, which means that provided you do not use the mouse and keyboard within a document, you will have full editing and correcting capabilities by voice. You can even issue the following commands, for example: “bold (words)” or “capitalize (words)” – although the initial response to these voice commands may seem a little slow. The Dictation Box functions quite well in LibreOffice, of course.

LibreOffice’s menus and icons cannot be clicked by voice, however, custom voice commands are easily written to perform the many available features within LibreOffice.

Does anyone else have experience with Dragon?

Notes:

  • http://en.libreofficeforum.org/node/1732 - "Sadly, it has performed so badly with Dragon that it looks like it is back to OpenOffice"