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What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

There is a discussion at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

Some suggestions for the AskLO site:

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common except to indicate that it applies across components.

  2. Include other applicable tags. File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf. Macro language: basic, python, java. Operating system: x64, linux, windows. Others: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.

  3. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's easy enough to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 8 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  4. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or meaningfully used. That's how I figured out the difference between meta and common. Have a look at the most popular tags; for example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  5. Since that can be difficult because of how this site is designed, use tags from other better-designed sites.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

Yes, it is a problem. You could go through each tag variation and then retag to standardize. I do this on occasion. However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, but searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.

What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

There is a discussion at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

Some suggestions for the AskLO site:

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common except to indicate that it applies across components.

  2. Include other applicable tags. For example:

  • Operating system: x64, linux, windows.
  • File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf. pdf.
  • Macro language: basic, python, java. Operating system: x64, linux, windows. Others: java.
  • The topic: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, currency, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.

  1. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's easy enough possible to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 8 6 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  2. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or meaningfully appropriately used. That's how I figured out the difference between meta and common. Have a look at the most popular tags; for example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  3. Since that can be difficult because of how this site is designed, use Use tags from other better-designed sites.

There is a discussion at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

Yes, it is a problem. You could go through each tag variation and then retag to standardize. I do this on occasion. However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, but searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.

What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common except to indicate that it applies across components.

  2. Include other applicable tags. For example:

  • Operating system: x64, linux, windows.
  • File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf.
  • Macro language: basic, python, java.
  • The topic: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, currency, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.
  1. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's possible to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 6 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  2. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or appropriately used. That's how I figured out the difference between meta and common. Have a look at the most popular tags; for example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  3. Use tags from other better-designed sites.

There is a discussion at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

You could go through each tag variation and then retag to standardize. I do this on occasion. However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, but searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.

What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common except to indicate that it applies across components.

  2. Include other applicable tags. For example:

    • Operating system: x64, linux, windows.
    • File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf.
    • Macro language: basic, python, java.
    • The topic: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, currency, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.
  3. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's possible to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 6 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  4. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or appropriately used. That's how I figured out the difference between meta and common. Have a look at the most popular tags; for example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  5. Use tags from other better-designed sites.

There is a discussion at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

You could On occasion, I go through each variation for a particular tag variation and then retag to standardize. I do this on occasion. Click retag, change the values and press Enter. This requires 50 karma points.

However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags.tags, so for many tags, this may not be practical.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, but although searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.

What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common except unless it is important to indicate that it applies across components.

  2. Include Add other applicable tags. For example:These may include:

    • Operating system: x64, linux, windows.
    • File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf.
    • Macro language: basic, python, java.
    • The A category for the topic: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, currency, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.
    • Macro language: basic, python, java.
  3. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's possible to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 6 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  4. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or appropriately used. That's how I figured out the difference between meta and common. Have a look at the most popular tags; for . For example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  5. Use tags from other better-designed sites.

There is a discussion related question at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

On occasion, I go through each variation for a particular tag and then retag to standardize. Click retag, change the values and press Enter. This requires 50 karma points.

However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags, so for in many tags, cases, this may not be practical.practical. Fix the tags that are most important to you.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, although searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.

What guidelines should be used for creating tags?

  1. Tag which component the question applies to: writer, calc, base, impress, math. Don't use common unless it is important to indicate that it applies across components. EDIT 2018-May-21: Quoting a wiki error message, "At least one of the following tags is required: common, writer, calc, impress, base, draw, math, or meta." So there is no choice but to use common in many cases.

  2. Add other applicable tags. These may include:

    • Operating system: x64, linux, windows.
    • File format: docx, doc, odt, xls, csv, pdf.
    • A category for the topic: styles, font, formula, chart, print, date, currency, tables, forms, search, spellcheck, filter.
    • Macro language: basic, python, java.
  3. Don't use non-applicable tags to draw in more readers. There is no need on this site, as it's possible to browse all new questions. A good number is perhaps 2 to 6 tags, depending on which tags apply.

  4. Research tags on this site to see how they are most commonly or appropriately used. Have a look at the most popular tags. For example, I would choose styles over style because it is more popular.

  5. Use tags from other better-designed sites.

There is a related question at https://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/61307/on-guidelines-to-tagging-and-avoiding-unnecessary-tags.

What makes a tag the most useful?

As @Mark McLean said, tags help find related questions about a particular topic.

Tags also provide more information about the question. So, if the question is "How do I write a macro to say Hello, World" then the answer will be different depending on whether it is tagged writer or calc.

I see all sorts of variations of the same words and combinations with _ or -

On occasion, I go through each variation for a particular tag and then retag to standardize. Click retag, change the values and press Enter. This requires 50 karma points.

However, this site's flaws make it difficult to encourage consistency for tags, so in many cases, this may not be practical. Fix the tags that are most important to you.

Is that a problem for conducting good searches?

To some extent, although searches can be performed on full text to avoid this problem.