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To use ADRESS() (correctly applying INDIRECT as already explained by @Jim K ) together with OFFSET is clearly a detour.
Using =OFFSET(K13;-1;+5) in cell K13 e.g. with the relative address of the current cell the formula should do the same, and also behave the same way if copied / filled elsewhere.
But that's still a strange detour: =P12, again used in K13 with the relative address would do it the easy (and less error-prone) way.

It guess you had to ask the question because you wanted to emulate a reference in the R1C1-style reading =R[-1]C[5]? Don't worry. Relative addressing is standard in LibrOffice. Simply choose the target for one example cell and make sure the cell address doesn't contain a "$". It will behave relative then under Copy / Fill.

Explanation:
Understanding the rectified original formula =OFFSET(INDIRECT(ADDRESS(ROW();COLUMN();4));-1;5) would result in the reference to the cell one row above and 5 columns to the right which is the same as you get with tzhe above

To use ADRESS() (correctly applying INDIRECT as already explained by @Jim K ) together with OFFSET is clearly a detour.

Assuming the cell to get the formula is K13 (e.g.). Using =OFFSET(K13;-1;+5) in cell K13 e.g. with the relative address of the current cell the formula should do the same, and also behave the same way if copied / filled elsewhere.

But that's still a strange detour: =P12, detour: =P12, again used in K13 with the relative address would do it the easy (and less error-prone) way.

It Dare I guess you had to ask the question because you wanted to emulate a reference in the R1C1-style reading =R[-1]C[5]? Don't worry. Relative addressing is standard in LibrOffice. Simply choose the target for one example cell and make sure the cell address doesn't contain a "$". It will behave relative then under Copy / Fill.

Explanation:
Understanding the rectified original formula =OFFSET(INDIRECT(ADDRESS(ROW();COLUMN();4));-1;5) would result in the reference to the cell one row above and 5 columns to the right of the current cell which is the same as you get with tzhe above

the above.

To use ADRESS() (correctly applying INDIRECT as already explained by @Jim K ) together with OFFSET is clearly a detour.

Assuming the cell to get the formula is K13 (e.g.). Using =OFFSET(K13;-1;+5) with the relative address of the current cell the formula should do the same, and also behave the same way if copied / filled elsewhere.

But that's still a strange detour: =P12, again used in K13 with the relative address would do it the easy (and less error-prone) way.

Dare I guess you had to ask the question because you wanted to emulate a reference in the R1C1-style reading =R[-1]C[5]? Don't worry. Relative addressing is standard in LibrOffice. Simply choose the target for one example cell and make sure the cell address doesn't contain a "$". It will behave relative then under Copy / Fill.

Explanation:
Understanding the rectified original formula =OFFSET(INDIRECT(ADDRESS(ROW();COLUMN();4));-1;5) would result in the reference to the cell one row above and 5 columns to the right of the current cell which is the same as you get with the above.

above.

Edit 2018-03-21 regarding the fourth comment on the thanks by @PAlotta:

As announced there I make this attachment.