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Quoting @appreciatehelp: "What's the difference?"
The difference is the contenttype of the cell. If that type is 'Text' (forced by format code "@" e.g.) and you see a "date" like "12/07/2017" the cell actually contains these 10 characters. Filling this down the incrementing process for text wiil apply, meaning that the final numeric part (that's "2017" in the example) will be incremented, and in case there is none at the end, the starting numeric part will play the role. Actual dates as specified for spreadsheets are, however, numbers. In caes of the example the content of the cell having a content type 'Number' with subtype 'Date' (only represented by an appropriate format code) will be the number

Quoting @appreciatehelp: "What's the difference?"
The difference is the contenttype of the cell. If that type is 'Text' (forced by format code "@" e.g.) and you see a "date" like "12/07/2017" the cell actually contains these 10 characters. Filling this down the incrementing process for text wiil apply, meaning that the final numeric part (that's "2017" in the example) will be incremented, and in case there is none at the end, the starting numeric part will play the role. Actual dates as specified for spreadsheets are, however, numbers. In caes of the example the content of the cell having a content type 'Number' with subtype 'Date' (only represented by an appropriate format code) will be the number 42928 though the display may be "12/07/2017" or whatever is generated due to the chosen Numbers format code. In this case the automatic incrementing will add simply one per step, meaning the next day, and the incresing values will carry to the months and finally to the years independent of the specific chosen format.

Quoting @appreciatehelp: "What's the difference?"
The difference is the contenttype of the cell. If that type is 'Text' (forced by format code "@" e.g.) and you see a "date" like "12/07/2017" the cell actually contains these 10 characters. Filling this down the incrementing process for text wiil will apply, meaning that the final numeric part (that's "2017" in the example) will be incremented, and in case there is none at the end, the starting numeric part will play the role. Actual dates as specified for spreadsheets are, however, numbers. In caes the case of the example the content of the cell having a content type 'Number' with subtype 'Date' (only represented by an appropriate format code) will be the number 42928 though the display may be show "12/07/2017" or whatever is generated due to the chosen Numbers format code. In this case the automatic incrementing for numbers will simply add simply one per step, meaning the next day, and the incresing increasing values will carry to the months and finally to the years independent of the specific chosen format.

Quoting @appreciatehelp: @appreciatethehelp: "What's the difference?"
The difference is the contenttype of the cell. If that type is 'Text' (forced by format code "@" e.g.) and you see a "date" like "12/07/2017" the cell actually contains these 10 characters. Filling this down the incrementing process for text will apply, meaning that the final numeric part (that's "2017" in the example) will be incremented, and in case there is none at the end, the starting numeric part will play the role. Actual dates as specified for spreadsheets are, however, numbers. In the case of the example the content of the cell having a content type 'Number' with subtype 'Date' (only represented by an appropriate format code) will be the number 42928 though the display may show "12/07/2017" or whatever is generated due to the chosen Numbers format code. In this case the automatic incrementing for numbers will simply add one per step, meaning the next day, and the increasing values will carry to the months and finally to the years independent of the specific chosen format.

Quoting @appreciatethehelp: "What's the difference?"
The difference is the contenttype of the cell. If that type is 'Text' (forced by format code "@" e.g.) and you see a "date" like "12/07/2017" the cell actually contains these 10 characters. Filling this down the incrementing process for text will apply, meaning that the final numeric part (that's "2017" in the example) will be incremented, and in case there is none at the end, the starting numeric part will play the role. Actual dates as specified for spreadsheets are, however, numbers. In the case of the example the content of the cell having a content type 'Number' with subtype 'Date' (only represented by an appropriate format code) will be the number 42928 (the 42928th day after 1899-12-30) though the display may show "12/07/2017" or whatever is generated due to the chosen Numbers format code. In this case the automatic incrementing for numbers will simply add one per step, meaning the next day, and the increasing values will carry to the months and finally to the years independent of the specific chosen format.