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I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice. I have not heard of any other serious players, unless you count alternative types such as Latex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind, although I find it unnecessarily complex.

To me, the question comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB.NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice. I have not heard of any LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players, unless you count players I hear much about are alternative types such as Latex LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind, although I find it unnecessarily complex.XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the question choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO.IMHO. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office.

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB.NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux.

This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office.

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB.NET, VB_.NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office.

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB_.NET, VB_dot_NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office.

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The MS ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB_dot_NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. <rant> Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Why would anyone do that when LibreOffice is available? Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have many bugs and viruses and are much worse than LibreOffice IMHO. viruses. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office.Office. </rant>

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The MS ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB_dot_NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches. glitches, and formats such as .docx are more widely accepted. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. <rant> Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Why would anyone do that when LibreOffice is available? Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have bugs and viruses. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office. </rant>

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The MS ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB_dot_NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.

I agree with what @ajlittoz wrote, and like him, I prefer LibreOffice.

However, I am told that MS Office really does have fewer glitches, and formats such as .docx are more widely accepted. glitches. If you're looking for a smoother experience, then that might be it. Some of my colleagues prefer MS Office, while others prefer LibreOffice.

To see whether it's for you, try the basic online version of MS Office for free. It requires creating an account, and there are many limitations such as no ability to run macros.

The only other serious players I hear much about are alternative types such as LaTex or XMLmind. Many of my colleagues recommend XMLmind. Neither of these sound like what you are looking for.

To me, the choice between LO and MSO comes down to your preferred style of working. Closed source requires trusting that the application developer has designed and provided instructions that meet your needs. I often find this frustrating because it makes it difficult to get information on how exactly it works, or how to get it to do what I want it to do.

The MS formats such as .docx are more widely accepted, and while LO can save as .docx, it causes many problems. My recommendation is either save as .odt with LO, or save as .docx with MSO. For reading only, either suite can open either format.

A big reason that I promote LibreOffice at work is ownership requirements. <rant> Many of my colleagues are from certain parts of Asia where mostly pirated versions of MS Word are used. Why would anyone do that when LibreOffice is available? Not only is this unethical, but such versions tend to have bugs and viruses. More than once I have had to fix someone's PC because of pirated MS Office. </rant>

Also, LibreOffice works well on Linux. And a personal preference: The MS ribbon interface makes me feel that it's impossible to find anything. I'm happy, though, that LO is developing MUFFIN for those that like it.

As a programmer, I am more comfortable with Java and Python than C# and VB_dot_NET, so again, LibreOffice is a better fit for me. This is not an issue for you, however.