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In the InfoWorld article you link to, it appears that this additionally restricted license is only for version 8 of Java SE:

In an undated bulletin about the revision, Oracle said public updates for Java SE 8 released after January 2019 will not be available for business, commercial, or production use without a commercial license. However, public updates for Java SE 8 will be available for individual, personal use through at least the end of 2020.

Java versions 9 and 10 are out, so why not use those? They work with LibreOffice.

Anyway, if you're running Java on Windows, you're most likely running Oracle's distribution of Java which is already restricted and non-free (hence the Ask Jeeves adware you might have installed with it):

Sun (now part of Oracle) has relicensed most of its Java platform reference implementation under the GNU General Public License, and there is now a free development environment for Java. Thus, the Java language as such is no longer a trap.

You must be careful, however, because not every Java platform is free. Sun continues distributing an executable Java platform which is nonfree, and other companies do so too.

The free environment for Java is called IcedTea; the source code Sun freed is included in that. So that is the one you should use. Many GNU/Linux distributions come with IcedTea, but some include nonfree Java platforms. (Note, added 10/2015: The free implementation of Java is known as OpenJDK in many GNU/Linux distributions.)

So, your licensing question only applies to *version 8"" of Oracle's distribution of Java SE, *which has been non-free the whole time anyway. It does not apply to the OpenJDK which is fully free software.

Apparently OpenJDK is available for Windows, although if you're concerned about restrictions on what you are allowed to do with the software you use, you shouldn't be running Windows anyway.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

In the InfoWorld article you link to, it appears that this additionally restricted license is only for version 8 of Java SE:

In an undated bulletin about the revision, Oracle said public updates for Java SE 8 released after January 2019 will not be available for business, commercial, or production use without a commercial license. However, public updates for Java SE 8 will be available for individual, personal use through at least the end of 2020.

Java versions 9 and 10 are out, so why not use those? They work with LibreOffice.

Anyway, if you're running Java on Windows, you're most likely running Oracle's distribution of Java which is already restricted and non-free (hence the Ask Jeeves adware you might have installed with it):

Sun (now part of Oracle) has relicensed most of its Java platform reference implementation under the GNU General Public License, and there is now a free development environment for Java. Thus, the Java language as such is no longer a trap.

You must be careful, however, because not every Java platform is free. Sun continues distributing an executable Java platform which is nonfree, and other companies do so too.

The free environment for Java is called IcedTea; the source code Sun freed is included in that. So that is the one you should use. Many GNU/Linux distributions come with IcedTea, but some include nonfree Java platforms. (Note, added 10/2015: The free implementation of Java is known as OpenJDK in many GNU/Linux distributions.)

So, your licensing question only applies to *version 8"" version 8 of Oracle's distribution of Java SE, *which which has been non-free the whole time anyway. It does not apply to the OpenJDK which is fully free software.

Apparently OpenJDK is available for Windows, although if you're concerned about restrictions on what you are allowed to do with the software you use, you shouldn't be running Windows anyway.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

In the InfoWorld article you link to, it appears that this additionally restricted license is only for version 8 of Java SE:

In an undated bulletin about the revision, Oracle said public updates for Java SE 8 released after January 2019 will not be available for business, commercial, or production use without a commercial license. However, public updates for Java SE 8 will be available for individual, personal use through at least the end of 2020.

Java versions 9 and 10 are out, so why not use those? They work with LibreOffice.

Anyway, if you're running Java on Windows, you're most likely running Oracle's distribution of Java which is already restricted and non-free (hence the Ask Jeeves adware you might have installed with it):

Sun (now part of Oracle) has relicensed most of its Java platform reference implementation under the GNU General Public License, and there is now a free development environment for Java. Thus, the Java language as such is no longer a trap.

You must be careful, however, because not every Java platform is free. Sun continues distributing an executable Java platform which is nonfree, and other companies do so too.

The free environment for Java is called IcedTea; the source code Sun freed is included in that. So that is the one you should use. Many GNU/Linux distributions come with IcedTea, but some include nonfree Java platforms. (Note, added 10/2015: The free implementation of Java is known as OpenJDK in many GNU/Linux distributions.)

So, additionally your licensing question only applies to version 8 of Oracle's distribution of Java SE, which has been non-free the whole time anyway. It does not apply to the OpenJDK which is fully free software.

Apparently OpenJDK is available for Windows, although if you're concerned about restrictions on what you are allowed to do with the software you use, you shouldn't be running Windows anyway.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

In the InfoWorld article you link to, it appears that this additionally restricted license is only for version 8 of Java SE:

In an undated bulletin about the revision, Oracle said public updates for Java SE 8 released after January 2019 will not be available for business, commercial, or production use without a commercial license. However, public updates for Java SE 8 will be available for individual, personal use through at least the end of 2020.

Java versions 9 and 10 are out, so why not use those? They work with LibreOffice.

Anyway, if you're running Java on Windows, you're most likely running Oracle's distribution of Java which is already restricted and non-free (hence the Ask Jeeves adware you might have installed with it):

Sun (now part of Oracle) has relicensed most of its Java platform reference implementation under the GNU General Public License, and there is now a free development environment for Java. Thus, the Java language as such is no longer a trap.

You must be careful, however, because not every Java platform is free. Sun continues distributing an executable Java platform which is nonfree, and other companies do so too.

The free environment for Java is called IcedTea; the source code Sun freed is included in that. So that is the one you should use. Many GNU/Linux distributions come with IcedTea, but some include nonfree Java platforms. (Note, added 10/2015: The free implementation of Java is known as OpenJDK in many GNU/Linux distributions.)

So, additionally your licensing question only applies to of Oracle's distribution of Java SE, which has been non-free the whole time anyway. It does not apply to the OpenJDK which is fully free software.

Apparently OpenJDK is available for Windows, although if you're concerned about restrictions on what you are allowed to do with the software you use, you shouldn't be running Windows anyway.

I don't see how Oracle charging for updates for an old proprietary version of Java should have anything to do with LibreOffice.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.

In the InfoWorld article you link to, it appears that this additionally restricted license is only for version 8 of Java SE:

In an undated bulletin about the revision, Oracle said public updates for Java SE 8 released after January 2019 will not be available for business, commercial, or production use without a commercial license. However, public updates for Java SE 8 will be available for individual, personal use through at least the end of 2020.

Java versions 9 and 10 are out, so why not use those? They work with LibreOffice.

Anyway, if you're running Java on Windows, you're most likely running Oracle's distribution of Java which is already restricted and non-free (hence the Ask Jeeves adware you might have installed with it):

Sun (now part of Oracle) has relicensed most of its Java platform reference implementation under the GNU General Public License, and there is now a free development environment for Java. Thus, the Java language as such is no longer a trap.

You must be careful, however, because not every Java platform is free. Sun continues distributing an executable Java platform which is nonfree, and other companies do so too.

The free environment for Java is called IcedTea; the source code Sun freed is included in that. So that is the one you should use. Many GNU/Linux distributions come with IcedTea, but some include nonfree Java platforms. (Note, added 10/2015: The free implementation of Java is known as OpenJDK in many GNU/Linux distributions.)

So, additionally your Therefore this licensing question issue only applies to of Oracle's distribution of Java SE, which has been non-free the whole time anyway. It does not apply to the OpenJDK which is fully free software.

Apparently OpenJDK is available for Windows, although if you're concerned about restrictions on what you are allowed to do with the software you use, you shouldn't be running Windows anyway.

I don't see how Oracle charging for updates for an old proprietary version of Java should have anything to do with LibreOffice.

Please correct me if I'm wrong.