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I think the way this font family is constructed is confusing LibreOffice and you.
There is no defined Regular font which is normally what a Style Group is based on.
Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic (R/I/B/BI).

This font family has a Gotham style group which is comprised of the following 4 fonts:
Book, Book Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic.

So when i select Gotham from the font list I am actually getting is Gotham Book.
This appears to be the font you want based on the images I see here.
I can see this is the font style that selected in the Character dialog.

image description

On the first slide the font selected is Gotham Medium which does not appear to be the font you want.
Too heavy compared to your example.

Usually the fonts used to print are the same as those used for Export to PDF.
So you can check to see if the correct font file is being used by examining the PDF.
This is an example of Gotham Book. Looks good onscreen. Correct font in the PDF.

image description

.

I know that LO on Linux does get fonts confused in different ways than on Windows.
One way to minimize font substitution confusion errors is to only install the fonts you are actually using.
So if you are only using Gotham Book, only install that font. Remove the other Gotham fonts.

In my font family tests I have seen some situations where LO is confused and all on its own applies fake bold to a font.
Hopefully that is not what is happening here.

.

I think the way this font family is constructed is confusing LibreOffice and you.
There is no defined Regular font which is normally what a Style Group is based on.
Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic (R/I/B/BI).

This font family has a Gotham style group which is comprised of the following 4 fonts:
Book, Book Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic.

So when i select Gotham from the font list I am actually getting is Gotham Book.
This appears to be the font you want based on the images I see here.
I can see this is the font style that selected in the Character dialog.

image description

On the first slide the font selected is Gotham Medium which does not appear to be the font you want.
Too heavy compared to your example.

Usually the fonts used to print are the same as those used for Export to PDF.
So you can check to see if the correct font file is being used by examining the PDF.
This is an example of Gotham Book. Looks good onscreen. Correct font in the PDF.

image description

.

I know that LO on Linux does get fonts confused in different ways than on Windows.
One way to minimize font substitution confusion errors is to only install the fonts you are actually using.
So if you are only using Gotham Book, only install that font.
Remove the other Gotham fonts.
Un-install Gotham Medium if not using it.

In my font family tests I have seen some situations where LO is confused and all on its own applies fake bold to a font.
Hopefully that is not what is happening here.

.

I think the way this font family is constructed is confusing LibreOffice and you.
There is no defined Regular font which is normally what a Style Group is based on.
Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic (R/I/B/BI).

This font family has a Gotham style group which is comprised of the following 4 fonts:
Book, Book Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic.

So when i I select Gotham from the font list I am actually getting is Gotham Book.
This appears to be the font you want based on the images I see here.
I can see this is the font style that selected in the Character dialog.

image description

On the first slide the font selected is Gotham Medium which does not appear to be the font you want.
Too heavy compared to your example.

Usually the fonts used to print are the same as those used for Export to PDF.
So you can check to see if the correct font file is being used by examining the PDF.
This is an example of Gotham Book. Looks good onscreen. Correct font in the PDF.

image description

.

I know that LO on Linux does get fonts confused in different ways than on Windows.
One way to minimize font substitution confusion errors is to only install the fonts you are actually using.
So if you are only using Gotham Book, only install that font.
Remove the other Gotham fonts.
Un-install Gotham Medium if not using it.

In my font family tests I have seen some situations where LO is confused and all on its own applies fake bold to a font.
Hopefully that is not what is happening here.

.

I think the way this font family is constructed is confusing LibreOffice and you.
There is no defined Regular font which is normally what a Style Group is based on.
Regular, Italic, Bold, Bold Italic (R/I/B/BI).

This font family has a Gotham style group which is comprised of the following 4 fonts:
Book, Book Italic, Bold, and Bold Italic.

So when I select Gotham from the font list what I am actually getting is Gotham Book.
This appears to be the font you want based on the images I see here.
I can see this is the font style that selected in the Character dialog.

image description

On the first slide the font selected is Gotham Medium which does not appear to be the font you want.
Too heavy compared to your example.

Usually the fonts used to print are the same as those used for Export to PDF.
So you can check to see if the correct font file is being used by examining the PDF.
This is an example of Gotham Book. Looks good onscreen. Correct font in the PDF.

image description

.

I know that LO on Linux does get fonts confused in different ways than on Windows.
One way to minimize font substitution confusion errors is to only install the fonts you are actually using.
So if you are only using Gotham Book, only install that font.
Remove the other Gotham fonts.
Un-install Gotham Medium if not using it.

In my font family tests I have seen some situations where LO is confused and all on its own applies fake bold to a font.
Hopefully that is not what is happening here.

.