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Given an array (table) of numbers (e.g., A1:C3) and a single other multiplier (e.g., D1), you are going to need a second array for the formulas (answers) to go (e.g., E1:G3). Use absolute addressing to refer to the multiplier (e.g., $D$1) and relative addressing to refer to the first cell in the first array (e.g., A1). For example,

  1. In E1 enter =A1*$D$1.
  2. Click and drag this cell to G1.
  3. With E1:G1 still highlighted, click and drag this cell range to G3.

Given an array (table) of numbers (e.g., A1:C3) and a single other multiplier (e.g., D1), you are going to need a second array for the formulas (answers) to go (e.g., E1:G3). Use absolute addressing to refer to the multiplier (e.g., $D$1) and relative addressing to refer to the first cell in the first array (e.g., A1) and absolute addressing to refer to the multiplier (e.g., $D$1). For example,

  1. In E1 enter =A1*$D$1.
  2. Click and drag this cell to G1.
  3. With E1:G1 still highlighted, click and drag this cell range to G3.

Given an array (table) of numbers (e.g., A1:C3) and a single other multiplier (e.g., D1), you are going to need a second array for the formulas (answers) to go (e.g., E1:G3). Use relative addressing to refer to the first cell in the first array (e.g., A1) and absolute addressing to refer to the multiplier (e.g., $D$1). For example,

  1. In E1 enter =A1*$D$1.
  2. Click and drag this cell to G1.
  3. With E1:G1 still highlighted, click and drag this cell range to G3.

EDIT: Also refer this answer.