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Please note: In Calc the % character can be used as a POSTFIX OPERATOR for any term that may occur as a factor. It denotes dividing by 100. Therefore you MUST NOT use it as a fomal apposition. It actually causes a calculation.

A general explanation:

From the mathematical point of view a percentage is simply a ratio. "InterestRate = Interest/Capital", e.g. The concept of the "InterestRate" does not depend on the form we prefer to mould the result in. You may contract an interest rate of "7/128" e.g. which is the same as "0.0546875" or "5.46875%" or "1/128 less than 1/16". There were times when people preferred to put it this way. Nowadays we are trained to prefer expressing ratios (rates) with the denominator 100. Many are trained to believe that "percents" are something of a specific value. They aren't. We are taklking about a preferred way of communication.

Using spreadsheets you should always strictly distinguish between VALUES and the FORMATS they are displayed in. Concerning ratios this includes distinguishing between the ratio itself and the numerator of a fraction representing it based on a denominator of 100. Calling both numbers "percentage" is wrong by a factor of 100.

Thus: Calculate the RATIO (or the RATE), not a percentage! Calc will help you displaying it in the "percentage format". And you may safely forget all the formulae containing a factor or a divisor of 100.

Please note: In Calc the % character can be used as a POSTFIX OPERATOR for any term that may occur as a factor. It denotes dividing by 100. Therefore you MUST NOT use it as a fomal apposition. It actually causes a calculation.

A general explanation:remark:

From the mathematical point of view a percentage is simply a ratio. "InterestRate = Interest/Capital", e.g. The concept of the "InterestRate" does not depend on the form we prefer to mould the result in. You may contract an interest rate of "7/128" e.g. which is the same as "0.0546875" or "5.46875%" or "1/128 less than 1/16". There were times when people preferred to put it this way. Nowadays we are trained to prefer expressing ratios (rates) with the denominator 100. Many are trained to believe that "percents" are something of a specific value. They aren't. We are taklking about a preferred way of communication.

Using spreadsheets you should always strictly distinguish between VALUES and the FORMATS they are displayed in. Concerning ratios this includes distinguishing between the ratio itself and the numerator of a fraction representing it based on a denominator of 100. Calling both numbers "percentage" is wrong by a factor of 100.

Thus: Calculate the RATIO (or the RATE), not a percentage! Calc will help you displaying it in the "percentage format". And you may safely forget all the formulae containing a factor or a divisor of 100.

Please note: In Calc the % character can be used as a POSTFIX OPERATOR for any term that may occur as a factor. It denotes dividing by 100. Therefore you MUST NOT use it as a fomal apposition. It actually causes a calculation.

A general remark:

From the mathematical point of view a percentage is simply a ratio. "InterestRate = Interest/Capital", e.g. The concept of the "InterestRate" does not depend on the form we prefer to mould the result in. You may contract an interest rate of "7/128" e.g. which is the same as "0.0546875" or "5.46875%" or "1/128 less than 1/16". There were times when people preferred to put it this way. Nowadays we are trained to prefer expressing ratios (rates) with the denominator 100. Many are trained to believe that "percents" are something of a specific value. They aren't. We are taklking talking about a preferred way of communication.

Using spreadsheets you should always strictly distinguish between VALUES and the FORMATS they are displayed in. Concerning ratios this includes distinguishing between the ratio itself and the numerator of a fraction representing it based on a denominator of 100. Calling both numbers "percentage" is wrong by a factor of 100.

Thus: Calculate the RATIO (or the RATE), not a percentage! Calc will help you displaying it in the "percentage format". And you may safely forget all the formulae containing a factor or a divisor of 100.

Please note: In Calc the % character can be used as a POSTFIX OPERATOR for any term that may occur as a factor. It denotes dividing by 100. Therefore you MUST NOT use it as a fomal apposition. It actually causes a calculation.

A general remark:

From the mathematical point of view a percentage is simply a ratio. "InterestRate = Interest/Capital", e.g. The concept of the "InterestRate" does not depend on the form we prefer to mould the result in. You may contract an interest rate of "7/128" e.g. which is the same as "0.0546875" or "5.46875%" or "1/128 less than 1/16". There were times when people preferred to put it this way. Nowadays we are trained to prefer expressing ratios (rates) with the denominator 100. Many are trained to believe that "percents" are something of a specific value. They aren't. We are talking about a preferred way of communication.

Using spreadsheets you should always strictly distinguish between VALUES and the FORMATS they are displayed in. Concerning ratios this includes distinguishing between the ratio itself and the numerator of a fraction representing it based on a denominator of 100. Calling both of these numbers "percentage" is wrong by a factor of 100. 100.

Thus: Calculate the RATIO (or the RATE), not a percentage! Calc will help you displaying it in the "percentage format". And you may safely forget all the formulae containing a factor or a divisor of 100.