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I believe changing the hyphen in the dictionary would be technically difficult. HYPHEN-MINUS (U+2D) is valid in all the character sets Unicode but also US-ASCII, ISO-8859 etc and is a single byte (2D is less than FF). However NON-BREAKING-HYPHEN (U+2011) is Unicode and requires three bytes to describe and therefore not supported in US-ASCII, ISO-8859. This would stop the dictionaries from being general.

You could, however try seeing whether you could use AUTOCORRECT to modify the text on your system... Peter

I believe changing the hyphen in the dictionary would be technically difficult. HYPHEN-MINUS (U+2D) is valid in all the character sets Unicode but also US-ASCII, ISO-8859 etc and is a single byte (2D is less than FF). However NON-BREAKING-HYPHEN (U+2011) is Unicode and requires three bytes to describe and therefore not supported in US-ASCII, ISO-8859. This would stop the dictionaries from being general.

You could, however try seeing whether you could use AUTOCORRECT to modify the text on your system... Peter

Unicode UTF-8 includes both US-ASCII and ISO-8859-1. They use a single byte giving 127 or 255 characters. (U+FF). However, Unicode characters above (U+FF) can use two three or four bytes depending on the character and version of Unicode (UTF-8, UTF-16 or UTF-32), LibreOffice and the Internet defaults to UTF-8. (U+2011) requires three bytes in LibreOffice. Hence, what appears to be a simple single character change 2D to 2011 is not. The Unicode website http://www.unicode.org/ is a good source of online information. The Unicode Standard Manual I use gives a succinct 1400 page summary of the standard and is well worth reading to get a basic understanding of the issues.