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In addition to the above answer: there is the CONCATENATE function, which is what I used so far, before seeing Pedro's answer.

Why use it as it is longer but seems to do the same? Discover-ability (for me) and being more explicit in what you are doing; would consider keeping CONCATENATE for macro's, for example.

You can concatenate the contents of several cells using & Example: A1=Bad B1=Dog C1=A1&B1 = BadDog If you want to add a space between two text Values you need to type C1=A1&" "&B1 = Bad Dog (it's a space between the double quotes)

In addition to the above answer: there is the CONCATENATE function, which is what I used so far, before seeing Pedro's answer.

Why use it as it is longer but seems to do the same? Discover-ability (for me) and being more explicit in what you are doing; would consider keeping CONCATENATE for macro's, for example.

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No.3 Revision

updated 2017-06-25 21:42:33 +0200

Lupp gravatar image

You can concatenate the contents of several cells using & Example: A1=Bad B1=Dog C1=A1&B1 = BadDog If you want to add a space between two text Values you need to type C1=A1&" "&B1 = Bad Dog (it's a space between the double quotes)

In addition to the above answer: there is the CONCATENATE function, which is what I used so far, before seeing Pedro's answer.

Why use it as it is longer but seems to do the same? Discover-ability (for me) and being more explicit in what you are doing; would consider keeping CONCATENATE for macro's, for example.

(@Lupp also editing:)
Now and then a user may want to expand this in a way concatenating an arbitrary number of cell contents given by one or more cell ranges e.g.
Starting with V5.2 there was implemented the new function TEXTJOIN which works well for such a task since V5.3, and is capable of inserting a chosen deleimiter. There is also a setting to disregard empty content completely. The above example would be solved by =TEXTJOIN(" "; 0; A1:B1) e.g. returning "Bad Dog".

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No.4 Revision

updated 2017-06-25 21:43:22 +0200

Lupp gravatar image

You can concatenate the contents of several cells using & Example: A1=Bad B1=Dog C1=A1&B1 = BadDog If you want to add a space between two text Values you need to type C1=A1&" "&B1 = Bad Dog (it's a space between the double quotes)

In addition to the above answer: there is the CONCATENATE function, which is what I used so far, before seeing Pedro's answer.

Why use it as it is longer but seems to do the same? Discover-ability (for me) and being more explicit in what you are doing; would consider keeping CONCATENATE for macro's, for example.

(@Lupp also editing:)
Now and then a user may want to expand this in a way concatenating an arbitrary number of cell contents given by one or more cell ranges e.g.
Starting with V5.2 there was implemented the new function TEXTJOIN which works well for such a task since V5.3, and is capable of inserting a chosen deleimiter. delimiter. There is also a setting to disregard empty content completely. The above example would be solved by =TEXTJOIN(" "; 0; A1:B1) e.g. returning "Bad Dog".

click to hide/show revision 5
No.5 Revision

updated 2017-06-25 23:06:14 +0200

Lupp gravatar image

You can concatenate the contents of several cells using & Example: A1=Bad B1=Dog C1=A1&B1 = BadDog If you want to add a space between two text Values you need to type C1=A1&" "&B1 = Bad Dog (it's a space between the double quotes)

In addition to the above answer: there is the CONCATENATE function, which is what I used so far, before seeing Pedro's answer.

Why use it as it is longer but seems to do the same? Discover-ability (for me) and being more explicit in what you are doing; would consider keeping CONCATENATE for macro's, for example.

(@Lupp also editing:)
Now and then a user may want to expand this in a way concatenating an arbitrary number of cell contents given by one or more cell ranges e.g.
Starting with V5.2 there was implemented the new function TEXTJOIN which works well for such a task since V5.3, and is capable of inserting a chosen delimiter. There is also a setting to disregard empty content completely. The above example would be solved by =TEXTJOIN(" "; 0; A1:B1) e.g. returning "Bad Dog".

Dog".
(Editing again:)
Concerning the comment by @Gilberto Schiavinatto I attach this little demo.
Please also note: While testing a bit for this demo I had to experience that TEXTJOIN is still not correctly implemented with some respect. In the most simple cases this may not spoil the usability.