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(1.) V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode to character and back. By default the key is 'Alt'+C.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without the "U+" is also accepted.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed fonts contained
    the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode to character and back. glyph . By default the key for it is 'Alt'+C.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without the "U+" is also accepted.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed fonts contained
    the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
   
By default the key for it is 'Alt'+C.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
   
the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed fonts contained
    the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
    By default the key for it is 'Alt'+C.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
    the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed fonts contained
    contained the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
    By default the key for it is 'Alt'+C.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
    the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed fonts
    fonts contained the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
    By default the key for it is 'Alt'+C. 'Alt'+X.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
    the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed
    fonts contained the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.not. (Editing with respect to the answer by the OQ: The Alt+C was the default setting for de-locale. I changed it to the Alt+X for en-locales.
The mentioned note was https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/ReleaseNotes/5.1#Unicode_character_input_with_Alt.2BX.
A font containing glyphs for the special range of code points used here is indispensable. If the replacement can be locale / language dependent I do not know, but such a dependance is plausible. During one test even my system changed behaviour insofar without any changes ion the settings.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
    By default the key for it is 'Alt'+X.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
    the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed
    fonts contained the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not. not.

(Editing with respect to the answer by the OQ: The Alt+C was the default setting for de-locale. I changed it to the Alt+X for en-locales.
The mentioned note was https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/ReleaseNotes/5.1#Unicode_character_input_with_Alt.2BX.
A font containing glyphs for the special range of code points used here is indispensable. If the replacement can be locale / language dependent I do not know, but such a dependance is plausible. During one test even my system changed behaviour insofar without any changes ion the settings.

(1.) LibO V5.1 introduced toggling between unicode and glyph .
    By default the key for it is 'Alt'+X.
(2.) The format produced by LibO is like "U+1d513", but the code without
    the "U+" is also accepted. So are upper case letters for hex digits above 9.
(3.) On my (standard+) Win-10-system with LibO 5.2.0 none of the installed
    fonts contained the glyph you talked of as an example.
(4.) Google told me the 'FreeSerif' font was good for things like that.
(5.) Having installed it adding to my Win-Fonts LibO automatically created the needed replacement
    also with the default font chosen for the active paragraph.

Please report whether this works for you or (unfortunately) not.

(Editing with respect to the answer by the OQ: The Alt+C was the default setting for de-locale. de-UI. I changed it to the Alt+X for en-locales. en-UI.
The mentioned note was https://wiki.documentfoundation.org/ReleaseNotes/5.1#Unicode_character_input_with_Alt.2BX.
A font containing glyphs for the special range of code points used here is indispensable. If the replacement can be locale / language dependent I do not know, but such a dependance is plausible. During one test even my system changed behaviour insofar without any changes ion the settings.