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I answer only now because the question crept to the top active questions due to an update.

Don't know if you are still interested in a simple solution, but I had exactly the same concern and this how I solved it (without dmath extension). Remember that an equation is just an object like any others.

  1. Insert your variable (or any equation) as a formula.
  2. Once you return to your main stream (in Writer after leaving Math), right-click the variable (or equation) and select Object... from the pop-up menu.
  3. Click on the Wrap tab. You can now set the spacing around the object. Since the variable is considered a character in the paragrah, you can adjust only the left and right spacings. Set them to 0 to get the effect of a "standard" glyph so that appended punctuations will have the traditional appearance.
  4. Click OK.

You are done.

If you find this answer useful, please tick its check mark at left and, why not, upvote it.

I answer only now because the question crept to the top active questions due to an update.

Don't know if you are still interested in a simple solution, but I had exactly the same concern and this is how I solved it (without dmath extension). Remember that an equation is just an object like any others.

  1. Insert your variable (or any equation) as a formula.
  2. Once you return to your main stream (in Writer after leaving Math), right-click the variable (or equation) and select Object... from the pop-up menu.
  3. Click on the Wrap tab. You can now set the spacing around the object. Since the variable is considered a character in the paragrah, you can adjust only the left and right spacings. Set them to 0 to get the effect of a "standard" glyph so that appended punctuations will have the traditional appearance.
  4. Click OK.

You are done.

If you find this answer useful, please tick its check mark at left and, why not, upvote it.

I answer only now because the question crept to the top active questions due to an update.

Don't know if you are still interested in a simple solution, but I had exactly the same concern and this is how I solved it (without dmath extension). Remember that an equation is just an object like any others.

  1. Insert your variable (or any equation) as a formula.
  2. Once you return to your main stream (in Writer after leaving Math), right-click the variable (or equation) and select Object... from the pop-up menu.
  3. Click on the Wrap tab. You can now set the spacing around the object. Since the variable is considered a character in the paragrah, you can adjust only the left and right spacings. Set them to 0 to get the effect of a "standard" glyph so that appended punctuations will have the traditional appearance.
  4. Click OK.

You are done.

If you find this answer useful, please tick its check mark at left and, why not, upvote it.

EDIT: Answer @Zeca 's question in the comment below

Yes, this spacing can be made default. Formulas live in a frame with a style of their own: Formula. You can access this frame style in the Format->Styles and Formatting panel (or F11). Click on the middle (third) icon in the toolbar (frame styles). One of the styles is Formula. Right-click on it and select Modify....

If you need several different "styles" for your formulas (spacing, background colour, borders, ...), create them with a right-click and New.... To style the formula, select it and double click on the required frame style name.

Doing so (multiple formula styles), you can take advantage of the "hierarchical styles" feature: modification of a property in the "master" style automatically propagates down in the hierarchy if it is not overridden in a lower style.

I answer only now because the question crept to the top active questions due to an update.

Don't know if you are still interested in a simple solution, but I had exactly the same concern and this is how I solved it (without dmath extension). Remember that an equation is just an object like any others.

  1. Insert your variable (or any equation) as a formula.
  2. Once you return to your main stream (in Writer after leaving Math), right-click the variable (or equation) and select Object... from the pop-up menu.
  3. Click on the Wrap tab. You can now set the spacing around the object. Since the variable is considered a character in the paragrah, you can adjust only the left and right spacings. Set them to 0 to get the effect of a "standard" glyph so that appended punctuations will have the traditional appearance.
  4. Click OK.

You are done.

If you find this answer useful, please tick its check mark at left and, why not, upvote it.

EDIT: Answer to @Zeca 's question in the comment below

Yes, this spacing can be made default. Formulas live in a frame with a style of their own: Formula. You can access this frame style in the Format->Styles and Formatting panel (or F11). Click on the middle (third) icon in the toolbar (frame styles). One of the styles is Formula. Right-click on it and select Modify....

If you need several different "styles" for your formulas (spacing, background colour, borders, ...), create them with a right-click and New.... To style the formula, select it and double click on the required frame style name.

Doing so (multiple formula styles), you can take advantage of the "hierarchical styles" feature: modification of a property in the "master" style automatically propagates down in the hierarchy if it is not overridden in a lower style.