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I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

Note, this is for Mariadb on Debian. You might need to adjust this for other combinations.

1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Note MariaDB and Firefox currently have bugs when downloading tar.gz files. First MariaDB is serving the files with a http "Content-Encoding: gzip" header. This double zips the tar.gz file. Then Firefox gets confused and does not unzip it at all which is a bug. Better to use Chrome, or wget for now, or if using Firefox and you get a corrupt error, then gunzip, and tar -xf the resulting .tar file (which unzips it again before running untar).

Once you have it installed test it with:

mysql -u <your username, normally 'root'> --password='<your password>'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit

Note, you can stop and re-start the server (like if you want to move it's database path while it's stopped or change other settings in /etc/mysql/my.cfg) with:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series v 1.5.3 installed. You're looking for "Universal" mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. It's a little confusing that they don't call it a connector, but instead call it a client. On Debian copy this jar file to /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to deterimine where to put it.

3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath... Click Add Archive... Enter /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar (or your path and jar filename from above). Click Ok, and Ok.

image description

4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select:

* Connect to an existing database.

Now from here there are two ways to the same result. You can either a) select JDBC, or b) MySQL and then JDBC.

4a) Method A: JDBC (direct):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is "mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase", where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://. But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter "mysql://:)

I don't know how the JDBC Driver Class of "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" is arrived at but it works, (thanks to Ratslinger's answer for this). It's something about how the jar file that you installed above is pointed to. Click "Test Class" and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of * Yes, register the database for me, and X Open the database for editing, and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name=""> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method B: MySQL - then JDBC:

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

Note, this is for Mariadb on Debian. You might need to adjust this for other combinations.

1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Note MariaDB and Tip! MariaDB.com when used with a Firefox browser currently have bugs has problems when downloading tar.gz files. First MariaDB is serving the files with a http "Content-Encoding: gzip" header. This double zips the tar.gz file. Then Firefox gets confused and does not unzip it at all which is a bug. Better to use Chrome, or wget for now, or if now.

The details: First MariaDB is serving the files with a http "Content-Encoding: gzip" header. This double zips the tar.gz file. Then Firefox gets confused and does not unzip it at all which is a bug. If using Firefox and you get a corrupt error, then gunzip, and tar -xf the resulting .tar file (which unzips it again before running untar).

Once you have it MariaDB installed test it with:

mysql -u <your username, normally 'root'> --password='<your password>'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit

Note, you can stop and re-start the server (like if you want to move it's database path while it's stopped or change other settings in /etc/mysql/my.cfg) with:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series v 1.5.3 installed. You're looking for "Universal" mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. It's a little confusing that they don't call it a connector, but instead call it a client. On Debian copy this jar file to /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to deterimine where to put it.

3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath... Click Add Archive... Enter /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar (or your path and jar filename from above). Click Ok, and Ok.

image description

4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select:

* Connect to an existing database.

Now from here there are two ways to the same result. You can either a) select JDBC, or b) MySQL and then JDBC.

4a) Method A: JDBC (direct):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is "mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase", where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://. But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter "mysql://:)

I don't know how the JDBC Driver Class of "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" is arrived at but it works, (thanks to Ratslinger's answer for this). It's something about how the jar file that you installed above is pointed to. Click "Test Class" and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of * Yes, register the database for me, and X Open the database for editing, and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name=""> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method B: MySQL - then JDBC:

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

Note, this is for Mariadb on Debian. You might need to adjust this for other combinations.

1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Tip! MariaDB.com when used with a Firefox browser currently has problems when downloading tar.gz files. Better to use Chrome, or wget for now.

The details: First MariaDB is serving the files with a http "Content-Encoding: gzip" header. This double zips the tar.gz file. Then Firefox gets confused and does not unzip it at all which is a bug. If using Firefox and you get a corrupt error, then gunzip, and tar -xf the resulting .tar file (which unzips it again before running untar).

Once you have MariaDB installed test it with:

mysql -u <your username, normally 'root'> --password='<your password>'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit

Note, you can stop and re-start the server (like if you want to move it's database path while it's stopped or change other settings in /etc/mysql/my.cfg) with:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series v 1.5.3 installed. You're looking for "Universal" mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. It's a little confusing that they don't call it a connector, but instead call it a client. On Debian copy this jar file to /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to deterimine where to put it.

3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath... Click Add Archive... Enter /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar (or your path and jar filename from above). Click Ok, and Ok.

image description

4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select:

* Connect to an existing database.

Now from here there are two ways to the same result. You can either a) select JDBC, or b) MySQL and then JDBC.

4a) Method A: JDBC (direct):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is "mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase", where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://. But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter "mysql://:)

I don't know how the The JDBC Driver Class of is either "com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" is arrived or "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver". (This is gleaned from the file hierarchy inside the related JDBC *.jar driver files located at but it works, (thanks to Ratslinger's answer for this). It's something about how the jar the file directory set above). Note that you installed above is pointed to. free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site. Click "Test Class" and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of * Yes, register the database for me, and X Open the database for editing, and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name=""> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method B: MySQL - then JDBC:

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description

[Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

Note, this This is tested to work for Mariadb running on Debian. You might need to adjust this a dual boot Linux Debian/Windows 10 setup. Below are also some tips for other combinations.using MySQL.


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Tip! MariaDB.com when used with a Firefox browser currently has problems when downloading tar.gz files. Better to use Chrome, or wget for now.

The details: First Once you have MariaDB installed, you can test that MariaDB is serving the files working properly with a http "Content-Encoding: gzip" header. This double zips the tar.gz file. Then Firefox gets confused and does not unzip it at all which is a bug. If using Firefox and you get a corrupt error, then gunzip, and tar -xf the resulting .tar file (which unzips it again before running untar).

Once you have MariaDB installed test it with:

one of these:

  • In linux:

    mysql -u <your username, normally 'root'> username,="" normally="" 'root'=""> --password='<your password>'

password="">'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit

Note,

  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can stop and use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL is suppose to work under Wine.

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the server (like if you want to move it's database path while it's stopped or change other settings in /etc/mysql/my.cfg) with:MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series v 1.5.3 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. It's OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar file. (It's a little confusing that they don't call it a connector, but instead call it a client. because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file to /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar. into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to deterimine determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools Tools | Options Options | LibreOffice LibreOffice | Advanced Advanced | Set Classpath... Click , and click Add Archive... Enter Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar (or your path and jar filename from above).

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar

Click Ok, and Ok.Ok. For example:

image description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File File | New New | Database. Select:

* Database.  Select Connect to an existing database.

Now from here database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to get the same result. results: You can either simply select a) select JDBC, JDBC, or b) MySQL you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC.JDBC.

Use one of these two methods:

4a) Method A: a: Select JDBC (direct): (direct method):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is "mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase", mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase, where bigbase bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Perhaps (Notes: Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://. mariadb://.... But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter "mysql://:)mysql://... Also this seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing this is because we're talking to localhost. And finally you can also put in 127.0.0.1 instead of the word localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class is either needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" or "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver". (This is gleaned from when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy inside the related JDBC *.jar driver files located at the file directory set above). Note to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com .com web site.

Click "Test Class" Test Class and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails fails, check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Next>>. Accept the defaults of * of:

  • Yes, register the database for me, and
  • X Open the database for editing,

and click Finish. Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name=""> name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb .odb file you create.)

4b) Method B: MySQL - b: Select MySQL then JDBC:

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description

[Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

This is tested to work for Mariadb running on a dual boot Linux Debian/Windows 10 setup. Below are also some tips for using MySQL.


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Once you have MariaDB installed, you can test that MariaDB is working properly with one of these:

  • In linux:

    mysql -u <your username,="" normally="" 'root'=""> --password='<your password="">'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit
  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL is suppose to work under Wine.

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar file. (It's a little confusing because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath..., and click Add Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar

Click Ok, and Ok. For example:

image description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select Connect to an existing database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to get the same results: You can simply select a) JDBC, or b) you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC.

Use one of these two methods:

4a) Method a: Select JDBC (direct method):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase, where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Notes: Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://.... But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter mysql://... Also this seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing this is because we're talking to localhost. And finally you can also put in 127.0.0.1 instead of the word localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site.

Click Test Class and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails, check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of:

  • Yes, register the database for me, and
  • X Open the database for editing,

and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC:

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description


6) Inspecting your databases properties. Finally, you can inspect how your database is setup as follows:

image description

[Update: Only one of the two possible methods of connecting with JDBC allows relationships to work. See below under step 4. - Feb 3, 2017 ] [Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.

This is tested to work for Mariadb running on a dual boot Linux Debian/Windows 10 setup. Below are also some tips for using MySQL.


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Once you have MariaDB installed, you can test that MariaDB is working properly with one of these:

  • In linux:

    mysql -u <your username,="" normally="" 'root'=""> --password='<your password="">'

You should get something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]>quit
  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL is suppose to work under Wine.

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar file. (It's a little confusing because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath..., and click Add Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar

Click Ok, and Ok. For example:

image description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select Connect to an existing database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to get the same results: proceed: You can simply select a) JDBC, or b) you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC.

Use one of these two methods:. Method "a: allows you to view, open and edit your tables, but has a bug and does not allow table-to-table relationships to be viewed, edited, or work properly in subforms. If you choose method a you will get this error message when you select Tools,Relationships...

image description

4a) Method a: Select JDBC (direct method): (Direct method. Disables relationships!):

image description

image description

The general format of the Datasource URL is mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase, where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Notes: Perhaps someday this will be mariadb://.... But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter mysql://... Also this seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing this is because we're talking to localhost. And finally you can also put in 127.0.0.1 instead of the word localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site.

Click Test Class and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails, check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of:

  • Yes, register the database for me, and
  • X Open the database for editing,

and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC: (This method makes relationships work properly):

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

Note, in the following screen and with the version 5.3.0.3 upgrade, the "Connect directly" option is now gone.

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description


6) Inspecting your databases properties. Finally, you can inspect how your database is setup as follows:

image description

[Update: Only one of the two possible methods of connecting with JDBC allows relationships to work. See below under step 4. - Feb 3, 2017 ] [Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

I very much appreciated Ratslinger's answer, and it gave me at least one major important piece of information, but I was really looking for a more comprehensive answer, and one that showed you some of the actual screens you will be seeing, rather than the properties screens that you get once you're done, ...for people like me, who are very new to much of this. So I have tried to give a comprehensive guide below to my question above:

STEP BY STEP - How to do it.STEP

This is tested to work for Mariadb 10.1 running on a dual boot Linux Debian/Windows Debian 8.6/Windows 10 setup. Below . (Also below are also some tips for possibly using MySQL.).


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have the Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Once you have MariaDB installed, you can test that MariaDB is working properly with one of these:Test MariaDB:

  • In linux:

mysql -u <your username,="" normally="" 'root'=""> --password='<your password="">'

[your username, normally 'root'] --password='[your password]'

You should get a prompt, and enter something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+
 

MariaDB [(none)]>quit [(none)]> quit

  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL is suppose to work HeidiSQL works nicely under Wine.. (I think I like it better than phpMyAdmin.)

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.3.jar file. mariadb-java-client-1.5.7.jar file (v1.5.3 ok too). (It's a little confusing because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath..., and click Add Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jar/usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.3.jarC:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

Click Ok, and Ok. For example:example (when I was using the older 1.5.3 version):

image description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select Connect to an existing database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to proceed: You can simply select a) JDBC, or b) you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC. Method "a: allows you to view, open and edit your tables, but has a bug and does not allow table-to-table relationships to be viewed, edited, or work properly in subforms. If you choose method a you will get this error message when you select Tools,Relationships...

image description


4a) Method a: Select JDBC (Direct method. Disables relationships!):

image description

image description


4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC (This method makes relationships work properly):

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

Note, in the following screen the "Connect directly" option is now gone. Not sure why. (Think it might have to do with using the MariaDB Driver rather than the MySQL Driver.)

image description

image description

image description

The general format of Database name, Server, and Port number combine into what's called the Datasource URL is like this: mysql://hostname:port/database_name. For my example this is mysql://localhost.3306/bigbase, where bigbase is my database within MariaDB. (Notes: Perhaps someday this will be use mariadb://.... But even thought it's a MariaDB that you are using, for now enter mysql://... Also this even for MariaDB. Note, the URL seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing this is because we're talking to localhost. And finally you You can also put in use 127.0.0.1 instead of the word localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site.

Click Test Class and confirm that the driver is located.

Click Next>> and enter your MariaDB's username and password information. Then click Test Connection. If all goes ok you now have both a working driver, and a working path to your database setup. The most common User name is 'root". If this fails, check your Data source URL on the previous screen.

Click Next>>. Accept the defaults of:

  • Yes, register the database for me, and
  • X Open the database for editing,

and click Finish. Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC (This method makes relationships work properly):

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

image description

Note, in the following screen and with the version 5.3.0.3 upgrade, the "Connect directly" option is now gone.

image description

image description

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description


6) Inspecting your databases properties. Finally, you can inspect how your database is setup as follows:

image description

7) Edit | Database properties... gives:

image description

image description

[Update: Only one of the two possible methods of connecting with JDBC allows relationships to work. See below under step 4. - Feb 3, 2017 ] [Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

STEP BY STEP

This is tested to work for Mariadb 10.1 running on a dual boot Linux Debian 8.6/Windows 10. (Also below are some tips for possibly using MySQL).


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have the Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Test MariaDB:

  • In linux:
mysql -u [your username, normally 'root'] --password='[your password]'

You should get a prompt, and enter something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]> quit

  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL works nicely under Wine. (I think I like it better than phpMyAdmin.)

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.7.jar file (v1.5.3 ok too). (It's a little confusing because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath..., and click Add Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

Click Ok, and Ok. For example (when I was using the older 1.5.3 version):

image descriptionimage description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select Connect to an existing database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to proceed: You can simply select a) JDBC, or b) you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC. Method "a: allows you to view, open and edit your tables, but has a bug and does not allow table-to-table relationships to be viewed, edited, or work properly in subforms. If you choose method a you will get this error message when you select Tools,Relationships...

image description


4a) Method a: Select JDBC (Direct method. Disables relationships!):

image description


4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC (This method makes relationships work properly):

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

Note, in the following screen the "Connect directly" option is now gone. Not sure why. (Think it might have to do with using the MariaDB Driver rather than the MySQL Driver.)

image description

image description

image description

The Database name, Server, and Port number combine into what's called the Datasource URL like this: mysql://hostname:port/database_name. (Notes: Perhaps someday this will use mariadb://.... But for now enter mysql://... even for MariaDB. Note, the URL seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing because we're talking to localhost. You can also use 127.0.0.1 instead of localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site.

Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description


6) Inspecting your databases properties. Finally, you can inspect how your database is setup as follows:

image description

7) Edit | Database properties... gives:

image description

image description

  • [Update: Tried to also get this to work in OpenOffice but failed. Some notes in 1st paragraph below. May 30, 17]
  • [Update: Only one of the two possible methods of connecting with JDBC allows relationships to work. See below under step 4. - Feb 3, 2017 ] ]
  • [Update: Includes information for both Windows and Linux. - Jan 23, 2016]

    2016]

STEP BY STEP

This is tested to work for Mariadb 10.1 running on a dual boot Linux Debian 8.6/Windows 10. (Also below are some tips for possibly using MySQL). EDIT: I tried to get this to work on OpenOffice 4.1.3, but can't. First it wanted me to select the java class path archive in the home space rather than the root. I was able to manually type in the real address for it from the root. But then I got stopped when I tried to open the database below after I had entered the correct info in, especially "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver", but it comes back with the wrong driver class:

image description


1) If you don't already have it installed, install MariaDB from here. (I have the Debian Linux MariaDB 10.1 Series installed.)

Test MariaDB:

  • In linux:
mysql -u [your username, normally 'root'] --password='[your password]'

You should get a prompt, and enter something like:

MariaDB [(none)]> show databases;

+--------------------+
| Database           |
+--------------------+
| bigbase            |
| information_schema |
| mysql              |
| performance_schema |
| phpmyadmin         |
+--------------------+

MariaDB [(none)]> quit

  • In Windows 10, I don't know of a similar command line test, however you can use HeidiSQL.

  • Also in Linux HeidiSQL works nicely under Wine. (I think I like it better than phpMyAdmin.)

Data base settings are in /etc/mysql/my.cfg (in Linux), and in C:\ProgramData\MySQL\MySQL Server 5.6\my.ini (in Windows). You'll want to have the server stopped while editing these, especially if moving the path to the database files by changing the datadir parameter.

You can stop, start or re-start the MariaDB server as follows:

a) In Linux:

sudo service mysql stop
sudo vi /etc/mysql/my.cfg
sudo service mysql start

b) In Windows:

Start | Find `Services` | Scroll down to `MySQL56` and right click on it for options to stop, restart, etc.

2) Download and install the MariaDB JDBC connector jar file from here. I have the MariaDB Connector/J 1.5 Series (v 1.5.7) installed. You're looking for the "Universal" OS version (it's Java after all and will run on any OS), not the source, but you can also get the source if you like to peek inside to investigate the file hierarchy naming which will be used below. The important thing is you need the mariadb-java-client-1.5.7.jar file (v1.5.3 ok too). (It's a little confusing because it's sometimes called a connector, and sometimes a client, and it's both.)

  • On Linux Debian copy this jar file into /usr/share/java/. (I had a hard time finding where to copy it to. Another post suggested this location. Perhaps you could search your system for jar files. Or perhaps someone else can suggest how to determine where to put it.

  • On Windows copy this jar file into C:\Java\ (This is the suggested location, and because it is processor independent, it makes more sense than putting it into either of the two normal program file locations, i.e. C:\Program Files (x86)\ (which holds 32 bit programs) or C:\Program Files\ (which holds 64 bit programs).


3) Open LibreOffice (not LibreOffice Base, just LibreOffice) and go to Tools | Options | LibreOffice | Advanced | Set Classpath..., and click Add Archive (to add a specific Jar file, rather than a directory of them), then enter:

  • For Linux: /usr/share/java/mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

  • For Windows: C:\Java\mariadb-java-client.1.5.7.jar

image description


4) Setup your database for use. Go to File | New | Database. Select Connect to an existing database.

Tip: From here, there are two different ways to proceed: You can simply select a) JDBC, or b) you can firsts select MySQL and then JDBC. Method "a: allows you to view, open and edit your tables, but has a bug and does not allow table-to-table relationships to be viewed, edited, or work properly in subforms. If you choose method a you will get this error message when you select Tools,Relationships...

image description


4a) Method a: Select JDBC (Direct method. Disables relationships!):

image description


4b) Method b: Select MySQL then JDBC (This method makes relationships work properly):

This does the same thing as in 4a above, it just asks a few different questions to get there.

Note, in the following screen the "Connect directly" option is now gone. Not sure why. (Think it might have to do with using the MariaDB Driver rather than the MySQL Driver.)

image description

image description

image description

The Database name, Server, and Port number combine into what's called the Datasource URL like this: mysql://hostname:port/database_name. (Notes: Perhaps someday this will use mariadb://.... But for now enter mysql://... even for MariaDB. Note, the URL seems to work even when you don't have a web server setup. I'm guessing because we're talking to localhost. You can also use 127.0.0.1 instead of localhost.

The JDBC Driver Class needs: "org.mariadb.jdbc.Driver" for the MariaDB JDBC driver, or ("com.mysql.jdbc.Driver" when using the MySQL JDBC driver). (You can open up the jar file and drill down into the file hierarchy to see that the folder com contains mariadb contains jdbc contains the Driver.java file.)

Also note that the free MariaDB database stuff is at their .org site, and commercial MariaDB stuff is at their .com web site.

Then save your new *.odb database file in an appropriate location and give it a better name. I suggest you name it JDBC-<some name> so you know that this is a JDBC connected database. You can use this file to later open this database with the JDBC connnector. (I don't know why it says, ODF Database at the lower right of the screen, as it will be an .odb file you create.)

5) The results:

If all goes well you should get a screen like this:

image description


6) Inspecting your databases properties. Finally, you can inspect how your database is setup as follows:

image description

7) Edit | Database properties... gives:

image description

image description