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While I personally believe in open-source software, running LibreOffice on a Linux machine, I feel obliged to point out some issues which you really should consider.

In the discipline of psychology, the vast majority of refereed journals require submissions, with stringent formatting requirements, to be in MS Office format. Likewise, most conferences will expect presentations in MS Powerpoint format. These are potentially situations where otherwise minor formatting inconsistencies arising from translating from LibreOffice may be important.

If you are undertaking a PhD, one of your considerations should probably be what tools your supervisor(s), and external reviewers/examiners, are used to. Many academics rely heavily on MS Word and its track changes tools. While LibreOffice has made huge headway in recent years in compatibility in this area, I have experienced problems with documents constantly going back and forth between MS Office and LibreOffice, usually culminating in MS Office refusing to open the file.

There is also a move towards reproducible research which eschews office suites altogether in favour of Markdown or LateX more closely tied to statistical tools (eg. see http://jeromyanglim.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/video-knitr-rmarkdown-rstudio.html#more).

While I personally believe in open-source software, running LibreOffice on a Linux machine, I feel obliged to point out some issues which you really should consider.

In the discipline of psychology, the vast majority of refereed journals require submissions, with stringent formatting requirements, to be in MS Office format. Likewise, most conferences will expect presentations in MS Powerpoint format. These are potentially situations where otherwise minor formatting inconsistencies arising from translating from LibreOffice may be important.

If you are undertaking a PhD, one of your considerations should probably be what tools your supervisor(s), collaborators and external reviewers/examiners, are used to. Many academics rely heavily on MS Word and its track changes tools. While LibreOffice has made huge headway in recent years in compatibility in this area, I have experienced problems with documents constantly going back and forth between MS Office and LibreOffice, usually culminating in MS Office refusing to open the file.

There is also a move towards reproducible research which eschews office suites altogether in favour of Markdown or LateX more closely tied to statistical tools (eg. see http://jeromyanglim.blogspot.com.au/2012/07/video-knitr-rmarkdown-rstudio.html#more).