[Calc] How to use function names of spreadsheet formulas in a different language than the user interface?

asked 2018-02-05 17:13:41 +0100

remjg gravatar image

Hi,

I use LibreOffice Calc in English with the following configuration (from Tools > Options > Language settings > Languages):

  • User interface: English
  • Locale setting: French
  • Default language for documents: French

LibreOffice Calc seems to use the english function names for spreadsheet formulas. For instance, =AVERAGE() is used instead of =MOYENNE().

II know that's a very particular case, but I want to use the french function names for spreadsheets formulas (I'm a teacher, I need the same function names as my students).

I found in question 73177 that it is possible to specify that we want to use English function names in Tools > Options > LibreOffice Calc > Formula. Unfortunately, I can't seem to find a way to use French function names...

Is it possible to use spreadsheet function names in a different language than the user interface?

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Comments

1

The "English function names" are in fact the default function names always used in the persistent representation (file) e.g.
They are only replaced in congruence with the user interface language if not the option you mentioned above is set.
My honest advice: Teach your students to use the English (and de facto international) function names and the English UI. It's a great advantage to be able to get help from an English forum, e.g.
(BTW: I'm German and never use German function names.)

Lupp gravatar imageLupp ( 2018-02-05 17:42:26 +0100 )edit

I gladly second Lupp's advice, to teach function names and all other IT-related lingo in English. Being Dutch and living in Denmark, I encounter every day the struggle of people who use localized UI and can't find the right answer on the web. I have to say this with some sadness in my heart, because computers would, could and should be the solution to this/the Babylonian confusion in this world. And we all could use our native tongue.

Henk C. Meerhof gravatar imageHenk C. Meerhof ( 2018-02-05 19:57:56 +0100 )edit

I agree with the other comments. @Henk C. Meerhof: As a professional linguist, I would note that human languages are too complex for computers to fully understand, so while they can help, they are not the complete solution. Human involvement is required to ensure correct translation. 20 years ago, we were more optimistic about what computers can do in this regard than we are today.

Jim K gravatar imageJim K ( 2018-02-05 22:08:54 +0100 )edit

There should be a clear distinction between what can and what must not be translated. Function names, like programming language keywords, must not.

I remember the early days of the Macintosh when someone in Apple localised unwittingly the filenames used by the OS, resulting in a real mess, nearly unmanageable, when diskettes where exchanged between computers, first those from Apple based on another OS UI.

ajlittoz gravatar imageajlittoz ( 2018-02-06 09:36:02 +0100 )edit

I agree with you... There shouldn't be any translation for function names.

But my students are young (junior high school) and they need to know the french function names for their exam.

Anyway, seems like it's not possible for now.

remjg gravatar imageremjg ( 2018-02-16 20:56:43 +0100 )edit

(To "higher authority":)
Curricula and exams shouldn't be misused to enforce national stubbornness. There is a huge lot of French literature well worth to be studied and to get ones culture accented the French way. Any silly function name needn't be integrated into culture. It's just for use and technical communication, and it's even irrelevant if it is a word at all or a kind of acronym. There are lots of "urban" uglinesses we should actually fight whether the French or the German way.

Lupp gravatar imageLupp ( 2018-02-16 22:14:06 +0100 )edit