Ask Your Question
1

LibreOffice is creating duplicate documents?

asked 2018-07-11 15:54:02 +0200

MuingAffirmative gravatar image

Every once in a while (twice in the last two days) LibreOffice created a new duplicate document, and I'm left wondering which one is the latest document.

I think this latest time I moved the document - while it was open - to a new location.

When and why are duplicate documents created. I'm a new user to LibreOffice and I haven't had this issue when using Word, Pages or Text documents in the past.

Running Mac OS 10.13.6

Thanks for your assistance.

edit retag flag offensive close merge delete

3 Answers

Sort by » oldest newest most voted
2

answered 2018-07-11 16:33:44 +0200

floris v gravatar image

You should not move files that are open in no matter what program, ever. In fact, it shouldn't even be possible to do so. Check the Last modified dates of the two files, you will then find which one is the most recent. However, proofreading them and check for the last edits that you made to be absolutely sure that you found the real latest version.

edit flag offensive delete link more
1

answered 2018-07-13 11:34:28 +0200

Mike Kaganski gravatar image

Ability to move an opened file safely depends on specifics of a program opening that file. A program may operate on an opened file using its file name, or using a handle returned by OS. If it operates on handle, then on a Unix-like OS, moving the file does not invalidate the handle, and following file operations on the handle will affect the same file (keeping the same inode) in the new place.

But if the program operates on the file name, then moving the file to another place does not magically modify the program's remembered path to the initially opened file. When it will start writing to the file, it would use the same old path, and re-create a new file in old place (in the best case; or it may crash not finding the file at old place). And different programs have different needs and peculiarities, so unless you know its innards as developer, I'd suppose it's always unsafe to move opened files.

edit flag offensive delete link more
0

answered 2018-07-12 15:18:38 +0200

MuingAffirmative gravatar image

Okay, thanks! Why shouldn't I? I've done it a million times - well I exaggerate! What is the issue in doing so? I ask as I've never once had an issue with it.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

1

Reread my answer.

floris v gravatar imagefloris v ( 2018-07-12 15:54:56 +0200 )edit

Ability to move an opened file safely depends on specifics of a program opening that file. A program may operate on an opened file using its file name, or using a handle returned by OS. If it operates on handle, then on a Unix-like OS, moving the file does not invalidate the handle, and following file operations on the handle will affect the same file (keeping the same inode) in the new place.

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2018-07-12 15:59:49 +0200 )edit
1

But if the program operates on the file name, then moving the file to another place does not magically modify the program's remembered path to the initially opened file. When it will start writing to the file, it would use the same old path, and re-create a new file in old place. And different programs have different needs and peculiarities, so unless you know its innards as developer, I'd suppose it's always unsafe to move opened files.

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2018-07-12 16:02:19 +0200 )edit

Mike, that's an excellent answer, please post as such.

floris v gravatar imagefloris v ( 2018-07-13 11:26:27 +0200 )edit
Login/Signup to Answer

Question Tools

1 follower

Stats

Asked: 2018-07-11 15:54:02 +0200

Seen: 43 times

Last updated: Jul 13