Exporting a project as JPEG with 119 ppi results in 119 dpi?

asked 2020-02-15 13:16:46 +0200

eerg gravatar image

updated 2020-02-15 14:48:32 +0200

I prefer using LibreOffice Draw since I'm a newbie and it's easy to navigate, but maybe it's not the right application for design projects?

Saving it as 300 ppi results in 300 dpi (for good printing) according to the Windows properties, but the dimensions are 2880 x 4320 pixels, while it should be 3000 x 4500?

Really confusing.

UPDATE: Exporting the image as 119 ppi should result in a file with a resolution of 300 dpi?

When exporting the project as 24x36 inches other software says it's 9.60x14.40 inches, which is aout 24x36 centimeters.

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Comments

Your question is unclear.

What are you asking about? The title seems to ask why you set PPI when exporting, but Windows shows that as DPI (which is the question to Windows developers, as to why do they use a printer-related dots per inch term for image resolution which is measured in pixels per inch). But then in the question body, you seem to ask about something about number of pixels in the resulting images, and there you suddenly start talking about 300 ppi, but your screenshot still shows 119 ppi; and you are talking about presumably incorrect number of pixels for that 300-ppi image which you never show... (the number indeed seems OK for 119 ppi).

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2020-02-15 14:03:17 +0200 )edit

UPDATE: Exporting the image as 119 ppi should result in a file with a resolution of 300 dpi?

Why??? 😲 Do you think that ppi is per centimeter? No, it's pixel per inch, and dpi is dots per inch. By the way, if it were about centimeters, it would then be 118: 300 ppi is 118.1102 pixels per centimeter.

If you need 300 pixels per inch, use 300 pixels per inch.

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2020-02-15 14:52:26 +0200 )edit

I guess you missed "newbie" in the question body. I never claimed ppi was anything else than pixels per inch.

eerg gravatar imageeerg ( 2020-02-15 15:01:11 +0200 )edit

I guess you missed "newbie" in the question body

No I didn't. But newbie or not, a question should be asked such that people understand what is your problem. It's not required that you understand everything; but explicitly telling what you see and what you expect instead and why is a good thing.

Something like "I want to export a drawing with 300-dpi resolution; and I believe that I should use 119 ppi to do that, because e.g. I see it [on this page]; but when I do that, I get the result that unexpectedly tells that the image is 119 dpi, while I hoped it will be 300 dpi..."

(Offtopic: still, dpi is a printer resolution; ppi is an image resolution; measuring image resolution in dpi is wrong and is the result of ignorant developers using wrong term in their products...)

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2020-02-15 15:03:51 +0200 )edit