Ask Your Question
-1

How do I stop the jpeg picture from reverting to its original position landscape after I have rotated the picture and saved the document, then opened it again to find it has gone back to landscape ?

asked 2020-02-24 23:03:41 +0100

Mathoni Zuhrah gravatar image

updated 2020-08-05 00:22:27 +0100

Alex Kemp gravatar image

I placed a portrait picture in a document However, it was placed in landscape mode because it had been saved originally that way. I changed it to Portrait using rotate picture then save the document in RTF. There was text above and below the document pictures. After the save, I opened the document again and found the picture had reverted back to its original landscape mode position. How do I stop this

edit retag flag offensive close merge delete

Comments

Read these guidelines and ask a good question. In particular:

  1. Make the title short.
  2. Share a sample file.
gabix gravatar imagegabix ( 2020-02-25 08:10:22 +0100 )edit

2 Answers

Sort by » oldest newest most voted
1

answered 2020-02-25 07:55:24 +0100

Although @JohnHa is absolutely right telling you to always use native formats in any software to ensure correctness (which is what the warning shown when saving to non-native formats is about), still RTF is quite capable format, able to retain image rotation correctly. So, if LibreOffice fails do save rotated image in RTF correctly, it's a bug in LibreOffice.

Yet, I was unable to reproduce with Version: 6.4.1.1 (x64) Build ID: 56f3c78975db08733f771c53643b5d1aa7c57567 CPU threads: 12; OS: Windows 10.0 Build 18363; UI render: GL; VCL: win; Locale: ru-RU (ru_RU); UI-Language: en-US Calc: CL. Since you omitted the version you used, it could be a bug with some older version; or you could use some specific procedure (rotated 90° right? left? to some other degree?), which also wasn't described in detail.

So, first try with an up-to-date version; if the problem is reproduced there, please file a bug, and don't forget to describe the problem in detail. Attaching a sample ODT or RTF with an image to the bug, which you know would demonstrate the problem if follow the steps, would also be useful, even if you are sure that "any image in any file would do", since sometimes it's a specific configuration or an image format flavor, like produced by a specific scanner, or whatever, that might make difference.

edit flag offensive delete link more

Comments

I was unable to reproduce

And how would you? The asker has not supplied any sample file.

gabix gravatar imagegabix ( 2020-02-25 08:09:24 +0100 )edit

@gabix: of course; so I just did something simple: created an empty text document; inserted a JPEG image using Insert->Image; then rotated it left to 90° using context menu; saved to RTF, then reloaded.

So many unknowns: version? (which could also change default anchoring!) image size? (which could affect scaling, e.g. to fit the page!) Locale? (which could affect the page format, and together with image size, affect scaling etc.) JPEG flavor? (EXIF present? or was it, say, JPEG-2000?) Specific wrap? Position on page (depending on other data in the document, which was present, but was the image on upper part of the page? on lower part?)...

Mike Kaganski gravatar imageMike Kaganski ( 2020-02-25 08:14:49 +0100 )edit
1

answered 2020-02-25 00:01:58 +0100

JohnHa gravatar image

Saving the document as a .rtf is almost certainly the reason. Did you read the warning LO gave that saving as a .rtf file may lose formfitting and content? Or have you switched off that warning?

.rtf files are truly awful and very limited in their capability. You should always save your files as .odt.

edit flag offensive delete link more
Login/Signup to Answer

Question Tools

1 follower

Stats

Asked: 2020-02-24 23:03:41 +0100

Seen: 88 times

Last updated: Feb 25